Category : Census/Census Data

(Census Bureau) Millennials Outnumber Baby Boomers and Are Far More Diverse

Millennials, or America’s youth born between 1982 and 2000, now number 83.1 million and represent more than one quarter of the nation’s population. Their size exceeds that of the 75.4 million baby boomers, according to new U.S. Census Bureau estimates released today. Overall, millennials are more diverse than the generations that preceded them, with 44.2 percent being part of a minority race or ethnic group (that is, a group other than non-Hispanic, single-race white).

These latest population estimates examine changes among groups by age, sex, race and Hispanic origin nationally, as well as in all states and counties, between April 1, 2010, and July 1, 2014.

Even more diverse than millennials are the youngest Americans: those younger than 5 years old. In 2014, this group became majority-minority for the first time, with 50.2 percent being part of a minority race or ethnic group.

Reflecting these younger age groups, the population as a whole has become more racially and ethnically diverse in just the last decade, with the percentage minority climbing from 32.9 percent in 2004 to 37.9 percent in 2014.

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Posted in * Culture-Watch, * Economics, Politics, * International News & Commentary, America/U.S.A., Anthropology, Census/Census Data, Economy, Sociology, The U.S. Government, Theology, Young Adults

(Local Paper) Charleston seems certain to reclaim title as S.C.’s largest city soon

Some 239 years after South Carolina lawmakers decided to move the capital from Charleston to Columbia, and more than 65 years after the Capital City’s population eclipsed the Holy City’s, the title of the state’s largest city seems certain to switch back soon.

U.S. Census estimates released Wednesday showed Charleston ”” as well as Mount Pleasant and North Charleston ”” among the state’s fastest-growing cities.

Columbia, not so much, and Charleston’s population might have already eclipsed it ”” even with the Sergeant Jasper emptied out.

The 2015 population estimates ”” to be released at this time next year ”” could place Charleston as South Carolina’s largest city for the first time since World War II.

Read it all.

Posted in * Culture-Watch, * Economics, Politics, * South Carolina, Census/Census Data, City Government, Economy, Politics in General, State Government, The U.S. Government, Urban/City Life and Issues

(Local Paper) Coastal South Carolina remains a national hot spot for population growth

If the brisk pace of population growth and development along South Carolina’s coast seems unusual, that’s not your imagination.

The latest Census Bureau estimates show that few metropolitan areas in the nation are growing so quickly.

Myrtle Beach, Hilton Head and Charleston were the three fastest-growing metro areas on the Atlantic Coast in 2014, as they were in 2013.

Read it all.

Posted in * Economics, Politics, * South Carolina, Census/Census Data, Economy, Politics in General, State Government, The U.S. Government

Census Bureau–In 1990, 54 % of marriages were the first for both spouses and today it is 58%

“In 1990, 54 percent of marriages were the first for both spouses,” said Jamie Lewis, an analyst in the Census Bureau’s Fertility and Family Statistics Branch and one of the report’s authors. “Now, newlyweds are more likely to be walking down the aisle for the first time ”” 58 percent of recent marriages were a first for both. The stabilization or slight decrease in the divorce rate during this period may explain why more marriages today are first marriages.”

Below are a few highlights from the report:

About 13 percent of men age 15 and over have been married twice, compared with 14 percent of women.
Between 1996 and 2008-2012, the share of those who had married at least twice increased only for women age 50 and older and men 60 and older.

Read it all.

Posted in * Culture-Watch, * Economics, Politics, * International News & Commentary, America/U.S.A., Anthropology, Census/Census Data, Economy, Ethics / Moral Theology, History, Marriage & Family, Psychology, Religion & Culture, Sociology, The U.S. Government, Theology

Sat. Morning Stats–The top Ten US Cities gaining the most college grads frm 2007-2012

Ah, ah, ah–you need to guess before you look. Check it out from Forbes.

Posted in * Culture-Watch, * Economics, Politics, Census/Census Data, City Government, Economy, Labor/Labor Unions/Labor Market, Politics in General, The U.S. Government, Young Adults

S.C. was home to all 3 of the fastest-growing metro areas on Atlantic Coast in 2013

South Carolina was home to all three of the fastest-growing metropolitan areas on the Atlantic Coast in 2013, new Census Bureau estimates say.

Greater Charleston is the largest of those metro areas, and it has accounted for nearly a third of the state’s population growth since the last census in 2010.

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Posted in * Culture-Watch, * Economics, Politics, * South Carolina, Census/Census Data, Economy, The U.S. Government, Urban/City Life and Issues

(WSJ RTE Blog) About Half of Kids With Single Moms Live in Poverty

Children raised in single-parent households in the U.S. are far more likely to live in poverty than children with both parents present, according to Census figures released Monday. As a result, far more black and Hispanic children are raised in poverty than white kids.

Among all children living only with their mother, nearly half ”” or 45% ”” live below the poverty line, the Census Bureau said. For those living with just the father, about 21% lived in poverty. By comparison, only about 13% of children with both parents present in the household live below the poverty line.

Read it all.

Posted in * Culture-Watch, * Economics, Politics, * International News & Commentary, America/U.S.A., Census/Census Data, Children, Economy, Ethics / Moral Theology, Marriage & Family, Poverty, The U.S. Government, Theology

The Long Story of U.S. Debt, From 1790 to 2011, in 1 Little Chart

As the high-stakes wrangling over the fiscal cliff gets underway, we though it might be the proper moment to remind everybody just how the United States managed to become the world’s biggest debtor.

So, here’s how….

Read it all.

Posted in * Culture-Watch, * Economics, Politics, Budget, Census/Census Data, Economy, History, Medicare, Politics in General, Social Security, Taxes, The National Deficit, The U.S. Government

Nearly 50 million Americans in poverty under alternate Census Bureau measure

There were nearly 50 million Americans living in poverty in 2011, under an alternative measure released by the Census Bureau Wednesday.

That’s 16.1% of the nation, higher than the official poverty rate of 15%. The official rate, released in September, showed 46.6 million people living in poverty.

Read it all.

Posted in * Culture-Watch, * Economics, Politics, Census/Census Data, Economy, Personal Finance, Poverty, The U.S. Government

Demographic Time Bomb in Pictures and Dollar Amounts; Ratio of S. Sec. Benef. to Workers Exceeds 50%

Quick Stats[:]

As of 2012-06 the civilian labor force was 155,163,000
As of 2012-06 there were 111,145,000 in the private workforce
As of 2012-06 there were 56,174,538 collecting some form of SS or disability benefit
Ratio of SS beneficiaries to private employment just passed the 50% mark (50.54%)

….As of May 2012, the outlays are $756.9 billion annualized. Fewer worker relatively speaking, support more and more recipients with exponentially growing payments. This is supposed to work?

Read it all from Mish’s economics blog (another from the long queue of should-have-already-been-posted material).

Posted in * Culture-Watch, * Economics, Politics, * International News & Commentary, Aging / the Elderly, America/U.S.A., Budget, Census/Census Data, Credit Markets, Economy, House of Representatives, Labor/Labor Unions/Labor Market, Medicare, Middle Age, Office of the President, Politics in General, Psychology, Senate, Social Security, Taxes, The National Deficit, The U.S. Government, Young Adults

(NPR) The 2080 Census: The World As We (Don't) Know It

…imagine how cool it would be if, by some twist of time, the National Archives were to make available detailed census information from nearly 70 years in the future ”” the 2080 census.

We asked James Dator, director of the Hawaii Research Center for Futures Studies, what kind of information census takers will be soliciting seven decades in the future. Dator says that possible questions might include:

””Do you have a home, or “biophysical domicile”? If so, is it on Earth, the moon, Mars or elsewhere?

””What is your current sex?

””What is your permission number for drinking water?…

Read or listen to it all.

Posted in * Culture-Watch, * Economics, Politics, * International News & Commentary, America/U.S.A., Census/Census Data, Economy, History, Philosophy, Psychology, Science & Technology, The U.S. Government

Recent Statistics for the Episcopal Diocese of Oklahoma

According to the U.S.Census Bureau’s figures, Oklahoma has grown in population from 3,450,654 in 2000 to 3,751,351 in 2010. This represents a population growth of approximately 8.7% in this time frame. (Of passing interest, please note that the population of the United States as a whole went from 281,421,906 in 2000 to 308,745,538 in 2010, an overall American growth for the decade of 9.7%).

According to Episcopal Church statistics, the Diocese of Oklahoma went from Average Sunday Attendance (or ASA) of 7,290 in 2000 to 5,585 in 2010. This represents a decline of -23.4% during this decade.

Please note that if you go to the link toward the end of this sentence and enter “Oklahoma” as the name of the diocese and then “View Diocese Chart” underneath on the left you can see in pictorial form some of the data from 2000-2010.

Posted in * Anglican - Episcopal, * Christian Life / Church Life, * Economics, Politics, Census/Census Data, Economy, Episcopal Church (TEC), Parish Ministry, TEC Bishops, TEC Data, TEC Parishes, The U.S. Government

Recent Statistics for the Episcopal Diocese of Oregon

According to the U.S.Census Bureau’s figures, Oregon has grown in population from 3,421,399 in 2000 to 3,831,074 in 2010. This represents a population growth of approximately 12.0% in this time frame. (Of passing interest, please note that the population of the United States as a whole went from 281,421,906 in 2000 to 308,745,538 in 2010, an overall American growth for the decade of 9.7%).

According to Episcopal Church statistics, the Diocese of Oregon went from Average Sunday Attendance (or ASA) of 7,793 in 2000 to 6,547 in 2010. This represents a decline of 16.0% during this decade.

Please note that if you go to the link toward the end of this sentence and enter “Oregon” as the name of the diocese and then “View Diocese Chart” underneath on the left you can see in pictorial form some of the data from 2000-2010.

Posted in * Anglican - Episcopal, * Christian Life / Church Life, * Culture-Watch, * Economics, Politics, * International News & Commentary, America/U.S.A., Census/Census Data, Economy, Episcopal Church (TEC), Parish Ministry, Religion & Culture, TEC Data, TEC Parishes, The U.S. Government

(NC Reporter) Seismic shifts reshape US Roman Catholicism

From Philadelphia to Newark, N.J., New York to Boston, Cleveland to Chicago to Detroit and beyond, the church of the immigrants is going the same route as the old industrial America of our forebears. The huge plants — churches, schools and parish halls — markers of another era, like the hulking steel mills and manufacturing plants of old, can no longer be sustained. There aren’t enough Catholics left in those places, not enough priests and nuns and certainly not enough money to maintain the church as it once was.

According to the Center for Applied Research in the Apostolate at Georgetown University in Washington, the church in the United States has lost 1,359 parishes during the past 10 years, or 7.1 percent of the national total, and most of those have been in the Northeast and the Upper Midwest.

“I’m developing a theory that one of our major challenges today is that American Catholic leadership is being strangled by trying to maintain the behemoth of the institutional Catholicism that we inherited from the 1940s and ’50s,” New York Archbishop Timothy Dolan told NCR’s John Allen in the recently released book-length interview A People of Hope.

Read it all.

Posted in * Culture-Watch, * Economics, Politics, * International News & Commentary, * Religion News & Commentary, America/U.S.A., Census/Census Data, Economy, Labor/Labor Unions/Labor Market, Other Churches, Religion & Culture, Roman Catholic, The Credit Freeze Crisis of Fall 2008/The Recession of 2007--, The U.S. Government

Older, Suburban and Struggling, ”˜Near Poor’ Startle the Census

They drive cars, but seldom new ones. They earn paychecks, but not big ones. Many own homes. Most pay taxes. Half are married, and nearly half live in the suburbs. None are poor, but many describe themselves as barely scraping by.

Down but not quite out, these Americans form a diverse group sometimes called “near poor” and sometimes simply overlooked ”” and a new count suggests they are far more numerous than previously understood.

When the Census Bureau this month released a new measure of poverty, meant to better count disposable income, it began altering the portrait of national need. Perhaps the most startling differences between the old measure and the new involves data the government has not yet published, showing 51 million people with incomes less than 50 percent above the poverty line. That number of Americans is 76 percent higher than the official account, published in September. All told, that places 100 million people ”” one in three Americans ”” either in poverty or in the fretful zone just above it.

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Posted in * Culture-Watch, * Economics, Politics, * International News & Commentary, Aging / the Elderly, America/U.S.A., Census/Census Data, Economy, Personal Finance, Poverty, The Credit Freeze Crisis of Fall 2008/The Recession of 2007--, The U.S. Government