Category : * South Carolina

The Rev. David Booman’s sermon on Genesis 22– Does God Ask For To Much?

‘He’s not a tame lion,’ wrote CS Lewis of Aslan, the Christ-figure in his children’s books. Which was Lewis’ way of saying that God is not a tame god. A good God, yes. Safe and
predictable, no. But, one who will often lead his people into unthinkable, seemingly untenable places. Where our faith is stretched to the breaking point.

And you know, if God doesn’t sometimes shock us and make us really uncomfortable, He’s probably a god made in our image. Because, what are the chances that the God of the universe, reigning over all times and all cultures, is perfectly in lockstep with our worldview, our belief system, our morals, our political agenda.

No, if God is anything, we should expect that His ways are not our ways. That He’s not a tame lion.

Read it all and you can also listen to or download the sermon there.

Posted in * Anglican - Episcopal, * South Carolina, Ministry of the Ordained, Parish Ministry, Theology: Scripture

Kendall Harmon’s July 2 Sermon: Wrestling with the Strange but Important story of Abraham and Isaac (Genesis 22:1-14)

You can listen directly there and download the mp3 there.

Posted in * By Kendall, * South Carolina, Ministry of the Ordained, Preaching / Homiletics, Sermons & Teachings, Theology: Scripture

(Local paper Front Page) Sea Rise Study raises a warning flag for Lowcountry South Carolina

In just 18 years — less than the life of some mortgages — rising seas will cause disruptive flooding in about 170 coastal communities across the United States, including Edisto and Kiawah islands, a new analysis says.

Prepared by the Union of Concerned Scientists, a nonprofit science advocacy group, the report is said to be the first nationwide attempt to identify tipping points — times and places where flooding is so frequent that residents abandon their land or pump big bucks into projects to hold back the ocean.

No stranger to high water, Charleston already sees regular “nuisance floods” at seasonal high tides, though the problem has grown worse in recent years. Charleston averaged four days of tidal flooding 50 years ago. Last year, the city had a record 50 flooding days, many when the sun shined.

Even so, the city has yet to reach a “chronic inundation” threshold — when 10 percent or more of its usable, non-wetland area floods at least 26 times per year, according to the Union of Concerned Scientists report.

That will change within a couple of generations.

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Posted in * South Carolina, Energy, Natural Resources

The Latest Edition of the Diocese of South Carolina Enewsletter

Read it all.

Posted in * South Carolina, - Anglican: Latest News, Evangelism and Church Growth, Ministry of the Laity, Ministry of the Ordained, Parish Ministry

Charleston South Carolina named the No. 1 city in the U.S. again says Travel+Leisure magazine

Charleston is the nation’s No. 1 city again, and No. 2 in the world, according to the readers of Travel + Leisure magazine.

The recognition comes at a time when residents are increasingly worried about the city’s capacity to handle more visitors.

The results of this year’s survey were released Tuesday morning. Readers were asked to rate cities they had visited on sights/landmarks, culture/arts, restaurants/food, people/friendliness, shopping and value.

This is the fifth consecutive year the magazine’s readers have named Charleston the nation’s top city. Charleston was the top city in the world last year. This year San Miguel de Allende, Mexico, took the top global spot.

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Posted in * South Carolina, Travel, Urban/City Life and Issues

Karl Burns on the ACNA national Assembly–Faith, Family and Future

Faith: Our ACNA family is joined under one faith and the proclamation of the Good News of Jesus Christ. It was such a joy to know that I was among those who believed in the apostolic faith and were also excited about sharing this faith with those who do not yet believe. The witnesses and testimonies that I heard touched my heart and reinvigorated by faith. One of the more memorable faith stories came from Baroness Caroline Cox (CEO of Humanitarian Aid Relief Trust). She told us of the forced relocation of the Karen people of Myanmar (Burma) and a conversation she had with a Karen pastor named Simon. He stated the following:

They call us a displaced people, but thank God we are not misplaced. They say we they see no hope for our future, but thank God our future is as bright as the promises of God. They say the life of our people is a misery, but praise God our life is a mystery. For what they say is what they see and what they see is temporal; but ours is the eternal, and all because we put ourselves in the hands of the God we trust.

This testimony is only one of many that are part of our new family’s history. I pray that we will be encouraged by this and seek to have such faith as we serve and worship our Lord on the Barrier Islands and beyond.

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Posted in * South Carolina, Anglican Church in North America (ACNA)

A Citadel historian explains how the Revolutionary War was unique down South

Has South Carolina’s role in the Revolutionary War been overlooked?

Most historians of the American Revolution understand that the southern theater, and the southern campaigns in particular, were truly decisive in creating the circumstances for the ultimate British defeat. … The significance of the southern campaigns has not always gotten the degree of attention that it truly deserves. The work that’s come out in the past decades has really changed that previous neglect of the southern story.

Why has the North’s role received more attention?

There are a few reasons, actually. One is the presence of George Washington. With the exception of the siege of Yorktown in 1781, he didn’t command in the southern theater. Also, for much of the war, the northern or the middle theaters really were the focal point of the main army’s efforts. It wasn’t until late in the conflict that the British shifted the bulk of their military efforts to the Carolinas, but that arguably was the most decisive phase of the war. The British staked so much on obtaining victory in the southern colonies late in the war.

How did your new book set out to continue that shift of appreciating the South’s role in the war?

In the southern theater, this is where the British attempted for the first time in the war a true wide-scale pacification effort. … This was a really major undertaking on the part of the British — to attempt to control, under force of arms, such a huge swath of territory.

Read it all from the local paper.

Posted in * South Carolina, America/U.S.A., Military / Armed Forces

(Local Paper) Visitors laud Charleston airport tribute to Emanuel AME Church shooting victims

Surrounded by eloquent words and somber images, Rayna Kneuper Hall of Mount Pleasant moves among the exhibits at Charleston International Airport set up in memory to the nine victims of the Emanuel AME Church shooting.

“It’s a beautiful tribute to the people and their families,” the part-time hospice worker said recently while showing the site to her friend’s 3-year-son, Edward Austin. “It’s so moving.”

She added, “It helps me remember the forgiveness and grace that the families showed as a natural reaction after the tragedy. … It made me so honored to be a Charlestonian.”

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Posted in * South Carolina, America/U.S.A., Church History, History, Race/Race Relations, Religion & Culture, Urban/City Life and Issues, Violence

The Diocese of South Carolina Contingent at the ACNA 2017 Assembly

Posted in * South Carolina, Anglican Church in North America (ACNA), Photos/Photography

The Diocese of South Carolina was received into the Anglican Church in North America This week

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Posted in * Anglican - Episcopal, * South Carolina, Anglican Church in North America (ACNA), Parish Ministry

(Local Paper) Remembering the Charleston 9 two Years Ago Today

Drums beat, a trumpet bellows and voices rise up in jubilant greeting of the morning, Pentecost Sunday. It’s a joyful day in the Christian church. Yet, here at Emanuel AME, sorrow still clings to the atmosphere, even two years later.

Memories of the nine who died here linger everywhere. They rest in worn spots on the pews. They float from the choir loft and resound from the pulpit. Downstairs in the fellowship hall, where blood flowed that night, bullet holes remain in the walls and tiles.

The date — June 17, 2015 — doesn’t feel very far away.

Read it all.

Posted in * South Carolina, America/U.S.A., Race/Race Relations, Religion & Culture, Urban/City Life and Issues, Violence

(Local Paper) Charleston Mayor John Tecklenburg, other S.C. leaders pledge commitment to Paris Climate Agreement

In defiance of President Donald Trump’s announcement last week to withdraw from the Paris Climate Agreement, local and state leaders across the country are pledging to carry out the goals of the international pact to fight climate change.

Charleston Mayor John Tecklenburg, Columbia Mayor Steve Benjamin and Anderson Mayor Terence Roberts signed the statement that supports ambitious goals to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in the United States.

Harris Pastides, president of the University of South Carolina, and Elizabeth Davis, president of Furman University, are among the other names and entities from the Palmetto State that support the landmark agreement. The list is compiled at wearestillin.com.

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Posted in * South Carolina, City Government, Energy, Natural Resources, Ethics / Moral Theology

A Kendall Harmon Pentecost Sermon: Power, Surprises and Understanding

You can listen directly there and download the mp3 there.

Posted in * By Kendall, * South Carolina, Pentecost, Preaching / Homiletics, Sermons & Teachings, Theology, Theology: Scripture

Resource Suggestion–Listen to The Spreading Flame–a series of 28 half-hour weekly podcasts giving you a sweeping view of the church through the centuries from Irenaeus and Augustine to C. S. Lewis and John Stott, led by Peter C. Moore w/ the ALI

Check it all out there.

Posted in * South Carolina, Adult Education, Church History

Bishop Mark Lawrence to Address at Cummins Seminary Commencement

The Rt. Rev. Mark J. Lawrence, Bishop of the Diocese of South Carolina, will deliver the Address at the 2017 Commencement ceremony of Cummins Theological Seminary in Summerville, SC. The Commencement will take place on Saturday, May 13, 3:00 p.m., in Bethel A.M.E. Church, 407 South Main Street, Summerville.

In September, 2016, Bishop Lawrence was elected to the Board of Trustees of the seminary by the Synod of the Reformed Episcopal Diocese of the Southeast. Also, during this academic year the seminary added three new members to the Faculty — The Rev. Dr. George Gatgounis, instructor in Biblical Hebrew; Fr. John Panagiotou, instructor in New Testament Greek, and the Rev. Dr. Charles Echols, adjunct professor of Old Testament.

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Posted in * Anglican - Episcopal, * South Carolina, Seminary / Theological Education