(ARDA) Older seminarians, especially minority women, face tough job market with rising student debt

The substantial increase in middle-aged Americans seeking second careers in the pulpit has been a godsend for seminaries faced with overall declines in enrollment and budget shortfalls.

And for many pursuing a clerical career in their 40s and 50s, it is a dream come true, a chance to follow what they consider God’s call and do meaningful work in their later years.

But the realities of a shrinking clergy labor market, and seminary tuition costs outpacing inflation, leave some facing debts of $80,000 or more trying to find work in a relatively low-paying profession.

The burden is falling particularly hard on prospective minority clergy with the fewest resources, analysts state.

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Posted in * Christian Life / Church Life, * Culture-Watch, * Economics, Politics, Economy, Labor/Labor Unions/Labor Market, Ministry of the Ordained, Parish Ministry, Religion & Culture, Seminary / Theological Education, Theology

One comment on “(ARDA) Older seminarians, especially minority women, face tough job market with rising student debt

  1. David Keller says:

    This confirms the definition of a modern main line seminary–an institution designed to take alimony money from middle aged women.