Daily Archives: November 3, 2010

(Catholic Herald)–Parishes joining the Ordinariate will have no difficulty finding a home

….in what the Telegraph calls “the prospect of a historic compromise”, William Fittall ”“ who might be described as the Sir Humphrey Appleby of the Church of England; he is secretary general of the General Synod ”“ said it would be “entirely possible” for those groups or parishes who join the Ordinariate to be allowed to share their former churches with Anglicans who remain in the Church of England.

I would go further: I think it highly likely. The fact is that maintaining its historic buildings is one of the Church of England’s biggest problems. Nothing is more logical than that the members of congregations who (in the Telegraph’s elegant usage) “defect” should share the building they are used to with those who elect to stay in the C of E, and should continue to contribute to its upkeep.

We have in fact seen all this before, in the case of two parishes in the Anglican diocese of London and Catholic Archdiocese of Westminster.

Read it all.

Posted in * Anglican - Episcopal, * Christian Life / Church Life, * Religion News & Commentary, Anglican Provinces, Church of England (CoE), Other Churches, Parish Ministry, Pope Benedict XVI, Roman Catholic

Freddie Mac in more losses as head predicts new slump

US mortgage agency Freddie Mac has suffered a further $4.1bn (£2.5bn) loss on bad home loans in the past quarter.

Meanwhile its head predicted “renewed pressure” on the US housing market.

“We believe it will be a considerable time before the housing market has a sustained recovery,” said chief executive Charles Haldeman.

Read it all.

Posted in * Economics, Politics, Consumer/consumer spending, Corporations/Corporate Life, Credit Markets, Economy, House of Representatives, Housing/Real Estate Market, Office of the President, Personal Finance, Politics in General, President Barack Obama, Senate, The Banking System/Sector, The Credit Freeze Crisis of Fall 2008/The Recession of 2007--, The U.S. Government

The Full Audio–Canon Ian Ellis Interviews Bishop Tom Wright

You may find the link here (22 minutes, 45 seconds long)–listen to it all.

Posted in * Anglican - Episcopal, * Culture-Watch, - Anglican: Commentary, Anglican Provinces, Church of England (CoE), Church of Ireland, CoE Bishops, Women

The Church of Ireland Gazette Interviews Bishop Tom Wright

Speaking to the Gazette editor in an interview while visiting Ireland, Bishop Tom Wright, former Bishop of Durham and now a Research Professor at the University of St Andrews, has said that the Church of England should not proceed to the consecration of women as Bishops if the move were to create a large division.

He said: “my own position is quite clear on this, that I have supported women Bishops in print and in person. I’ve spoken in Synod in favour of going that route, but I don’t think it’s something that ought to be done at the cost of a major division in the Church.”

Bishop Wright warned that if the Church of England were not able to resolve the matter “a ”˜quick fix’ resolution” would be “a recipe for long-term disaster”.

Read it all.

Posted in * Anglican - Episcopal, * Culture-Watch, - Anglican: Commentary, Anglican Provinces, Church of England (CoE), Church of Ireland, CoE Bishops, Women

Andrew Goddard–Framing the Anglican Covenant: Trick or Treat?

So, who wants an Anglican covenant? For some reason it is never acknowledged that the only province to sign up so far is Mexico, whose primate is a Patron of Inclusive Church (the other province close to signing is that well-known neo-Puritan African province, South Africa). He perhaps wants it for the same reasons many others have welcomed it.

The covenant will, for example, force the Church of England to stop thinking of itself simply as, in the words of the advertisement, ”˜the mother church of the Communion’ whose actions are so important that on its own it can prevent developments such as the covenant. It will create a more egalitarian and post-colonial international fellowship of churches affirming not simply an English ‘mother church’ but a common inheritance of faith and shared vision of life together “in communion with autonomy and accountability” (3.1.2). That will then shape their commitments, including mutual accountability, to one another and to a pattern of life marked by such virtues as spending time “with openness and patience in matters of theological debate and reflection, to listen, pray and study with one another in order to discern the will of God” (3.2.3).

Above all, the covenant will hopefully help refocus the Church of England and all covenanting churches on mission. That mission is not, as in the advert, defined by whether or not some outside the church are ”˜put off by the Church’s apparent reluctance to change’. It is rather ”˜God’s call to undertake evangelisation’ and ”˜share in the healing and reconciling mission’ of God in Christ ”˜”for our blessed but broken, hurting and fallen world”’ (2.2.1).

Read it all.

Posted in * Anglican - Episcopal, - Anglican: Analysis, Anglican Covenant, Anglican Provinces, Church of England (CoE), Ecclesiology, Instruments of Unity, Theology, Windsor Report / Process

(Baptist Times U.K.) Lausanne calls for church repentance

Lausanne Movement leaders have called for a new Reformation and challenged participants in the 2010 Congress to repentance, renewal and integrity. The Congress in Cape Town brought together more than 4000 evangelical delegates from 198 countries, and despite a sophisticated cyber-attack, many more were able to follow its proceedings on the internet.

Among its themes were how to reach out to other world faiths, ministry in the world’s 10 ‘mega-cities’, each with more than 10 million inhabitants, issues around justice and social action, and HIV/Aids.

The retiring chair of Lausanne’s theology working group, Dr Chris Wright, aimed his Saturday address at the church. ‘What hurts God most, is not just the sin of the world, but the failure, disobedience and rebellion of those he has redeemed.

‘We tend to spend all our time attacking and complaining about the world and ignoring our own failures.’Dr Wright referred to what he called ‘the idolatry of the church,’ pointing out the three idols that are ‘especially seductive’ for evangelical Christians: the idol of power and pride; the idol of popularity and success; and the idol of wealth and greed.

‘Reformation of the church is once again the desperate need,’ he said.

Read it all.

Posted in * Culture-Watch, * International News & Commentary, * Religion News & Commentary, Africa, Evangelicals, Globalization, Other Churches, South Africa, Theology

A WSJ editorial–Voters repudiate the Pelosi Democrats and the Obama agenda

A Congressional majority is a terrible thing to waste, as Rahm Emanuel might say, and yesterday the public took that lesson to heart. Americans erased a Democratic House majority and a huge swath of the “moderates” who Mr. Emanuel had personally recruited to build their majorities in 2006 and 2008 before he became White House chief of staff. They were ousted from power after a mere two terms for having pursued an agenda they didn’t advertise and that voters didn’t want.

Yes, the economy was the dominant issue and the root of much voter worry and frustration with Washington. But make no mistake, this was also an ideological repudiation of the Democratic agenda of the last two years. Independents turned with a vengeance on the same Democrats they had vaulted into the majority in the waning George W. Bush years, rejecting the economy-killing trio of $812 billion in stimulus spending, cap and tax and ObamaCare.

Read it all.

Posted in * Economics, Politics, House of Representatives, Office of the President, Politics in General, President Barack Obama, Senate, State Government

Blog Open Thread–What you think the Midterm Elections Mean

We are especially interested in your take on the local races where you live, as you will have more knowledge of them than the rest of us.

Posted in * Economics, Politics, * International News & Commentary, America/U.S.A., House of Representatives, Office of the President, Politics in General, President Barack Obama, Senate, State Government

(The State) South Carolina Analysis–Democratic party reeling after losses

South Carolina has never been this red, and the state Democratic Party has never been this lost.

For the first time since Reconstruction, all nine of South Carolina’s constitutional offices will be held by Republicans, come January.

The one statewide office Democrats held, the superintendent of education, was lost in Tuesday’s Republican landslide. Democrats failed to capture any of the eight other statewide offices already held by Republicans.

Read it all.

Posted in * Economics, Politics, * South Carolina, House of Representatives, Office of the President, Politics in General, President Barack Obama, Senate, State Government

NY Times Analysis–Another Election, Another Wave

Two years ago this week, triumphant Democrats were throwing around the word “realignment,” as in the kind of Democratic majority that could endure for a generation or more. Wednesday morning, those same Democrats awoke to find that their majority had not lasted for even another election cycle.

The question that will dominate the conversation among Democrats in the days ahead is how it came to this, especially since Republicans offered little to voters beyond an emphatic rejection of the president’s policies. Some Democrats believe they fell victim to the inevitable tide of midterm elections. Others blame the economy, plain and simple, while a growing chorus accuses Mr. Obama of failing to communicate the party’s successes.

The truth is that all these explanations probably played some role in the unraveling ”” though, in the case of Mr. Obama’s message, the failure may have deeper roots than his critics assume.

Read it all.

Posted in * Economics, Politics, * International News & Commentary, America/U.S.A., House of Representatives, Office of the President, Politics in General, President Barack Obama, Senate, State Government

California measure to legalize marijuana is defeated

California voters on Tuesday rejected a ballot measure that would have made their state the first in the union to legalize the personal use and possession of marijuana.

Voters there also considered whether to make it easier for state legislators to pass a budget, to suspend a state-passed global warming bill and to hand over the role of creating legislative districts to a nonpartisan commission.

The measures were among 160 put to voters around the country, on issues ranging from the new health-care law to ideas for balancing state budgets.

California was not the only state dealing with marijuana-related questions. In South Dakota, voters rejected an effort to legalize medical marijuana – which California and 13 other states have done over the past 15 years. Arizona voters were considering a similar measure.

Read it all.

Posted in * Culture-Watch, * Economics, Politics, Drugs/Drug Addiction, Law & Legal Issues, Politics in General, State Government

Washington Post–Once again, the electorate demanded a new start

There is no blunter way for voters to send a message. For the third election in a row, Americans kicked a political party out of power.

So you would think that, by now, politicians in Washington would have gotten the message: They must be doing something wrong.

From the moment they lift their right hands to take the oath of office, lawmakers are now on notice that their hard-won power may be short-lived.

Read it all.

Posted in * Economics, Politics, House of Representatives, Office of the President, Politics in General, President Barack Obama, Senate, State Government

538 Tries to Summarize What Happened Yesterday

From here:

Our current projection is that Republicans will finish with a total of 243 house seats: this would reflect a net gain of 65 from Democrats. The range of plausible outcomes is fairly small: our model thinks there is roughly a 90 percent chance that the G.O.P.’s total will eventually be somewhere between 64 seats and 66.

That’s an amazing result for Republicans ”” and far more remarkable from a historical perspective than the fact that Democrats were able to leg out a couple more wins than expected in the Senate. I’m not trying to be a media critic here, but Republicans have some legitimate gripe with portrayals of the night as having been a split decision.

Still, Democrats will finish with at least 52 of their Senators intact, unless they lose both Washington and Colorado, which is unlikely. That margin would be enough to prevent them from losing control of the Senate even if both Joseph I. Lieberman and Ben Nelson decided to caucus with Republicans.

Posted in * Economics, Politics, * International News & Commentary, America/U.S.A., House of Representatives, Office of the President, Politics in General, President Barack Obama, Senate, State Government

A Prayer to Begin the Day

Enable us, O heavenly Father, to walk with thee this day and every day in sure and simple trust; ever remembering that our little things are all big to thy love, and our big things are all small to thy power; through Jesus Christ our Lord.

Posted in * Christian Life / Church Life, Spirituality/Prayer

A Prayer for the Feast Day of Richard Hooker

O God of truth and peace, who didst raise up thy servant Richard Hooker in a day of bitter controversy to defend with sound reasoning and great charity the catholic and reformed religion: Grant that we may maintain that middle way, not as a compromise for the sake of peace, but as a comprehension for the sake of truth; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who liveth and reigneth with thee and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.

Posted in * Anglican - Episcopal, * Christian Life / Church Life, Anglican Provinces, Church History, Church of England (CoE), Theology