Category : Ministry of the Ordained

Greg Snyder’s Sermon yesterday at Saint John’s johns Island

The sermon starts some 32 minutes in.

Posted in * Anglican - Episcopal, * South Carolina, Church History, Ministry of the Ordained, Parish Ministry, Preaching / Homiletics

Kendall Harmon’s Sunday sermon–God’s grace to the slow of Heart to Believe (Luke 24:13-35)

There is also still more there.

Posted in * Anglican - Episcopal, * By Kendall, * South Carolina, Easter, Ministry of the Ordained, Parish Ministry, Preaching / Homiletics, Sermons & Teachings

(Northern Echo) Dean of Durham appointed new Dean of St Paul’s in London

The Queen has approved the appointment of the Dean of Durham, The Very Reverend Andrew Tremlett, as the new Dean of St Paul’s.

He will succeed The Very Reverend Dr David Ison, who is due to retire in September 2022.

Andrew will take over leadership at an important moment for St Paul’s as it plays a central role in the rejuvenation of the City of London following the pandemic. He will oversee a growing schedule of services and special events, as visitors from the UK and overseas begin to return in their numbers to the capital.

The Very Reverend Andrew Tremlett, said, “I am delighted to be appointed as Dean of St Paul’s, following David Ison’s faithful tenure over the past decade. I’m keenly aware that I join the team at St Paul’s at a pivotal time with both immediate and systemic challenges….”

Read it all.

Posted in Church of England (CoE), Ministry of the Ordained, Parish Ministry, Urban/City Life and Issues

Kendall Harmon’s Sunday Sermon–The powerful woman with no lines and no name (Luke 7:36-50)



Listen to it all or there is more there if you so desire.

Posted in * Anglican - Episcopal, * South Carolina, Christology, Ministry of the Ordained, Parish Ministry, Preaching / Homiletics, Soteriology, Theology: Scripture

Ad Clerum on Retirement from Pittsburgh interim ACNA Bishop Martyn Minns

And I am sure of this, that he who began a good work in you will bring it to completion at the day of Jesus Christ. (Philippians 1:6)

Retirement is a serious business in the Church of Nigeria (Anglican Communion), in a country in which there are minimal or non-existent pensions and inadequate healthcare for senior citizens. It is a particular challenge for clergy, who must often fend for themselves. Mandatory retirement age is 70, and to be sure that everyone was fully aware, and birth certificates have not been lost, each bishop’s retirement date is published every year. Shortly before my 70th birthday, Angela and I were called forward at a meeting of the Provincial Synod and we were each given a one-time cash payment of $1000 as our pension. I tried to object, knowing that for many of the poorer bishops this was a substantial amount of money. I was sure they could make better use of it than I could, but I was told, quite firmly, that was not an option. We expressed our heartfelt thanks and thought again about the importance of preparation for retirement.

The first and perhaps most important question is, “What are we retiring to?” Not “What are we retiring from?” Bishop Dave Bena, a dear friend and mentor, has retired a number of times. He retired from military service (he served with distinction as a Marine and then in the US Air Force), and he retired as the suffragan bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Albany, as my suffragan bishop in CANA, and most recently as the assistant bishop of the Anglican Diocese of the Living Word. He is something of an expert on retirement! But he spells it “retire-ment,” declaring that it is an opportunity to change tires and start a new journey.

One of the great blessings of ordained ministry is that while our particular place of service may change, our call to Gospel ministry remains unchanged – it is a lifelong call.

Read it all (quoted by yours truly at the conclusion to my Lenten teaching on a Christian theology of vocation, KSH).

Posted in Anglican Church in North America (ACNA), Anthropology, Church of Nigeria, Marriage & Family, Ministry of the Ordained, Parish Ministry, Pastoral Theology, Theology

A Rowan Williams sermon on the life and ministry of Oscar Romero on Archbishop Romero’s Feast Day–‘Life has the last word’

And so his question to all those who have the freedom to speak in the Church and for the Church is ‘who do you really speak for?’ But if we take seriously the underlying theme of his words and witness, that question is also, ‘who do you really feel with?’ Are you immersed in the real life of the Body, or is your life in Christ seen only as having the same sentiments as the powerful? Sentir con la Iglesia in the sense in which the mature Romero learned those words is what will teach you how to speak on behalf of the Body. And we must make no mistake about what this can entail: Romero knew that this kind of ‘feeling with the Church’ could only mean taking risks with and for the Body of Christ – so that, as he later put it, in words that are still shocking and sobering, it would be ‘sad’ if priests in such a context were not being killed alongside their flock. As of course they were in El Salvador, again and again in those nightmare years.

But he never suggests that speaking on behalf of the Body is the responsibility of a spiritual elite. He never dramatised the role of the priest so as to play down the responsibility of the people. If every priest and bishop were silenced, he said, ‘each of you will have to be God’s microphone. Each of you will have to be a messenger, a prophet. The Church will always exist as long as even one baptized person is alive.’ Each part of the Body, because it shares the sufferings of the whole – and the hope and radiance of the whole – has authority to speak out of that common life in the crucified and risen Jesus.

So Romero’s question and challenge is addressed to all of us, not only those who have the privilege of some sort of public megaphone for their voices. The Church is maintained in truth; and the whole Church has to be a community where truth is told about the abuses of power and the cries of the vulnerable. Once again, if we are serious about sentir con la Iglesia, we ask not only who we are speaking for but whose voice still needs to be heard, in the Church and in society at large. The questions here are as grave as they were thirty years ago. In Salvador itself, the methods of repression familiar in Romero’s day were still common until very recently. We can at least celebrate the fact that the present head of state there has not only apologized for government collusion in Romero’s murder but has also spoken boldly on behalf of those whose environment and livelihood are threatened by the rapacity of the mining companies, who are set on a new round of exploitation in Salvador and whose critics have been abducted and butchered just as so many were three decades back. The skies are not clear: our own Anglican bishop in Salvador was attacked ten days ago by unknown enemies; but the signs of hope are there, and the will to defend the poor and heal the wounds.

Read it all.

Posted in --El Salvador, Central America, Church History, Death / Burial / Funerals, Ministry of the Ordained, Roman Catholic

(Local Paper) South Carolina’s new Anglican bishop says ‘planting’ new churches key to growth

If anyone who knows what it takes to start a new church, it’s the new bishop of the Anglican Diocese of South Carolina.

Before being consecrated March 12 as the diocese’s top clergyman, the Right Rev. Chip Edgar helped grow a number of churches between Illinois and Florida by several hundred parishioners. His latest charge involved starting a new congregation of 25 parishioners that grew to 400 regular worshippers in Columbia. This all during an era where Christianity and mainline denominations have suffered decline and continue to navigate a pandemic that has forced them to find different ways to worship.

Despite the challenges facing mainline Christianity, Edgar believes in the diocese’s potential for growth. He agreed it will likely come about by starting new congregations.

Read it all.

Posted in * Anglican - Episcopal, * South Carolina, Ministry of the Ordained, Parish Ministry

T.F. Gailor on the Reverend Dr. James DeKoven for his Feast Day

As an educator, Dr. DeKoven has had no superior in this or any other land. The great qualities of a leader and guide to young men–dignity, tact, firmness, sympathy, genuineness of nature–these he possessed in a marked degree. He needed no artificial safeguards to maintain his claims to respect. His personal appearance was noble and commanding. His face, whether bright with humor, or stern with disapproval, or melting with sympathy, was always attractive to look on, with a peculiar refinement of spiritual power. Students who never hesitated to cover him with ribbons on the base-ball ground or to tease him with ridicule of his favorite players, would rather have faced a battery than appear before him for discipline. In his constant visits to their rooms at odd times, he was always one of them, giving and taking jests, happy over their games, sometimes even mildly tolerant of their mischief, but the slightest violation of propriety or morals would be rebuked by a change of countenance indescribable, but most effective. He knew all the students by name and their antecedents, and he tried to make each one feel that “the Doctor” and he had some confidences shared by no one else. As a rule, the students worshipped him. If there was any fault found by any of them it was that his horror of certain kinds of evil was so keen that he could not force himself to be lenient to offenders of that class. In one other respect, he was sometimes misunderstood. He was with some men more than with others. They were not always necessarily the best or most congenial. They were those who, in his opinion, needed most help, and if any man ever thought that he was neglected it was because he himself erected the barrier that kept that great heart away from him. Sincere, true, tender, genuine through and through, that the Doctor always was, and the contact with such a life was an everlasting blessing to those who discovered it in time. Some, perhaps, who read these lines will recall with various emotions the old days–the early chapel service, and the walks with the Doctor afterwards, the thrilling sermons, the Easter morning breakfasts, the Sunday …night receptions, the gathering on the lawn at commencement, the choir suppers, the recitations in Butler, the Seniors’ tea, the hundred other associations with the old place where he was the spirit and the head; but however the memory comes to them now, with whatever regrets or misgivings or grateful joy, it cannot but bring the picture of a grand, pure, unselfish personality which never once in all the storms that beat upon it faltered for an instant in its love or duty for the individual students committed to its care.

Read it all.

Posted in Church History, Education, Ministry of the Ordained, Parish Ministry, Seminary / Theological Education, Young Adults

The Latest Edition of the Anglican Diocese of South Carolina Enewsletter

The convention elected the following individuals to serve in the diocese:
Standing Committee: The Rev. Gary Beson, the Very Rev. Peet Dickinson, Wynne Boone and Judy McMeekin

Diocesan Council: The Rev. Chance Perdue, the Rev. Matthew Rivers, Janis Brazeale and Gill Frierson

Diocesan Trustees: Alonzo Galvan

Ecclesiastical Court: The Rev. Jeremy Shelton, the Rev. Greg Smith and the Rev. Nelson Weaver, Rick Adams and Seth Whitaker

ACNA Provincial Council: The Rev. Bob Lawrence (delegate), the Rev. Tyler Prescott (alternate), John Benson and Justin Johnson (delegates), Johnny Wallace and Dave Wright (alternates)

Missions Transition to Parish Status:
Congratulations to The Well, Myrtle Beach and Holy Apostles, Barnwell

One of the highlights of the convention was the welcoming of two missions which transitioned to parish status: The Well, Myrtle Beach and Holy Apostles, Barnwell. The clergy and representatives of the two churches received a standing ovation for their new status.

Read it all.

Posted in * Anglican - Episcopal, * South Carolina, Ministry of the Laity, Ministry of the Ordained, Parish Ministry

‘Norwich has topped the lot’ – Outgoing clergywoman gets city’s highest honour

Norwich’s outgoing reverend has been awarded the city’s highest civic honour.

The Very Rev Dr Jane Hedges was granted the Freedom of the City (FOTC) at a special council meeting on Tuesday.

Dr Hedges has been dean of Norwich Cathedral since 2014, the first woman to hold the role. She is due to stand down on May 1.

The reverend received praise for engaging new audiences through several initiatives including installing a helter-skelter in the nave and helping to bring the ‘Dippy the Dinosaur’ exhibition to the church.

Read it all.

Posted in Church of England (CoE), Ministry of the Ordained, Parish Ministry, Urban/City Life and Issues

Chip Edgar Consecrated Bishop of the Anglican Diocese of South Carolina

The Rt Revd Chip Edgar was consecrated Bishop of the Anglican Diocese of South Carolina at a festive service held at the Cathedral Church of St. Luke and St. Paul in Charleston, Saturday, March 12, 2022.

The service began with a lengthy processional of bishops, priests and deacons from the Anglican Diocese of South Carolina, the Diocese of the Southeast (Reformed Episcopal Church) and the Diocese of the Carolinas, as well as clergy from other dioceses, laity representing various diocesan ministries, institutions, and ministry partners.

The Archbishop of the Anglican Church in North America (ACNA), the Most Reverend Foley Beach was the chief consecrator and Bishops Mark Lawrence, Steve Wood and William White of the Anglican Diocese of South Carolina, the Diocese of the Carolinas, and the Diocese of the Southeast were co-consecrators. More than a dozen other bishops participated in the service.

“This gathering of people, everyone together… this is a picture of what heaven looks like,” said Edgar during the service. “There’s a kind of basking in it, that has just been overwhelming to me as the service has unfolded.”

In addition to the capacity crowd at the Cathedral, more than 1000 tuned in online from across the country and around the world to join the event.

Read it all.

Posted in * South Carolina, Ministry of the Ordained, Parish Ministry

Kendall Harmon’s Sunday sermon–What can we Learn from the story of Zaccheus (Luke 19:1-10)?

Listen to it all or there is more there if you so desire.

Posted in * By Kendall, * South Carolina, Christology, Ministry of the Ordained, Parish Ministry, Preaching / Homiletics, Sermons & Teachings, Soteriology, Theology, Theology: Scripture

Congratulation to, and prayers for, Chip and Beth Edgar

Posted in * Anglican - Episcopal, * South Carolina, Marriage & Family, Ministry of the Ordained, Parish Ministry

Chip Edgar Consecrated the new Bishop of the Anglican Diocese of South Carolina

Posted in * Anglican - Episcopal, * South Carolina, Ministry of the Ordained, Parish Ministry

A huge day for the Anglican Diocese of South Carolina–the Consecration of our new Bishop, Charles “Chip” Edgar

Please note that the event will be livestreamed for any of you so inclined.

Posted in * South Carolina, Liturgy, Music, Worship, Ministry of the Ordained, Parish Ministry

Big week for the Anglican Diocese of SC (II)–Diocesan Convention Meets This Friday

Read it all.

Posted in * Anglican - Episcopal, * South Carolina, Ministry of the Laity, Ministry of the Ordained, Parish Ministry

Big week for the Anglican Diocese of SC (I)–Charles “Chip” Edgar will be consecrated as the next Bishop on Saturday

The Very Revd Charles “Chip” Edgar will be consecrated as the next Bishop of The Anglican Diocese of South Carolina in a special service at the Cathedral Church of St. Luke and St. Paul in Charleston on Saturday, March 12, 2022.

The service will begin at 10 a.m. with a processional of the Bishop Elect, members of the College of Bishops of the Anglican Church in North America, retired Bishops and clergy of the Anglican Diocese of South Carolina, the Diocese of the Carolinas and the Reformed Episcopal Church.

The consecration will be led by the Most Revd Foley Beach, Archbishop of the Anglican Church in North America.

The Revd Dr. Jamey Graham, Pastor of Saint John Baptist Church in Columbia, South Carolina, will be the preacher. Pastor Graham and Bishop Elect Edgar began meeting together and developed a close friendship following the racial unrest in Baltimore in 2015. They have preached in one another’s pulpits and deepened the relationships between their families and congregations in the years since.

Read it all.

Posted in * South Carolina, Liturgy, Music, Worship, Ministry of the Ordained, Parish Ministry

Bishop Lawrence Looks Back on 14-Year Episcopacy in the Historic Anglican Diocese of South Carolina

Do you have any final thoughts on the state of the Church? State of the diocese?

I would say that if we prevail, if the parishes prevail in this lawsuit, I think there will be an explosiveness of energy that we’re capable of experiencing. I think it can unleash a great season of missional and ministry ventures that has been put on hold. And along with that, we’ve been on hold because of COVID so most people don’t know where they will be on the far side of that.

If you had one book, not the Bible, you think every person, laity and clergy read, what would it be?

One book? I’m not sure I think in those terms. But if I could only have three books for the rest of my life in addition to the Bible, I’d say a good Introduction to the Old Testament, an Introduction to the New Testament and The Complete Works of William Shakespeare. I would hope everyone could read The Confessions of St. Augustine before they die, but I’m not going to say that I want everyone to read that.

What’s the hardest thing about being the bishop?
For me, the hardest thing about being a bishop is not being rooted in a congregation.

You see, there are different styles of teaching and preaching. The kind of teaching I like best is expository teaching through the Bible or a book of the Bible, teaching a sequential class in a congregation on theology, basic Christian theology, or teaching a class on the history of the Church in England or history of the Anglican Church.

Read it all.

Posted in * Anglican - Episcopal, * South Carolina, Ministry of the Laity, Ministry of the Ordained, Parish Ministry, Pastoral Care, Pastoral Theology, Preaching / Homiletics, Theology: Scripture

Kendall Harmon’s Sunday sermon–What can we Learn from the Feeding of the 5000 (Luke 9:10-17)?

Listen to it all or there is more there if you so desire.

Posted in * Anglican - Episcopal, * By Kendall, * South Carolina, Christology, Ministry of the Ordained, Preaching / Homiletics, Theology: Scripture

(ITV) Dean of Canterbury who became viral sensation with his cathedral cat during lockdown to retire

The Dean of Canterbury, who became a viral sensation with his cat during lockdown, will retire on his 75th birthday.

Robert Willis has been in the role since July 2001 and will step down from the role of Dean on the 16th May.

Dean Robert’s daily online Morning Prayer videos, from Canterbury Cathedral, were well known to viewers during the pandemic.

Even more well known was his cat Leo, who was caught on camera wandering into view before disappearing beneath his robes.

Read it all.

Posted in Church of England (CoE), Ministry of the Ordained, Parish Ministry

(Barna Group) Pastors’ Credibility Is in Question—Even Among Pastors

For a while now, Barna has been reporting on the credibility crisis America’s pastors are facing. Overall, U.S. adults are unsure whether pastors in their local community can be trusted, are in touch with their community’s needs and are reliable sources of wisdom and leadership.

Amid lukewarm feelings about their credibility, pastors may wonder how they can regain the trust of their communities in the current climate. Below, we’ll share data from The Resilient Pastor—a newly released book from pastor, author and Barna senior fellow Dr. Glenn Packiam—to explore current perspectives on the credibility of America’s pastors as well as insights from Packiam on pastoral trustworthiness and reliability.

Just Half of Americans See Pastors as a Trustworthy Source of Wisdom
Recent Barna data collected amid the pandemic show that just 57 percent of all U.S. adults agree at least somewhat that a pastor is a trustworthy source of wisdom. Christians, naturally, are far more likely to agree (31% definitely, 40% somewhat), while non-Christians tend to disagree (18% not really, 29% definitely not).

Still, many Americans—including one in five Christians—admit feeling unsure whether pastors are trustworthy (24% all adults, 21% Christians, 31% non-Christians)….

Read it all.

Posted in * Culture-Watch, America/U.S.A., Ministry of the Ordained, Parish Ministry, Psychology, Religion & Culture, Sociology

South Carolina Diocese Expresses Deep Affection for Bishop Mark and Allison Lawrence

The Anglican Diocese of South Carolina gathered in Florence, SC, the evening of February 4, 2022, to celebrate the ministry of, and express their deep and abiding affection for both the Rt. Rev. Mark J. Lawrence, who has served as their Bishop for the last 14 years and his wife, Allison.

Bishop Lawrence will officially step down from his role in March following the consecration of the Very Rev. Chip Edgar.

The evening began with a reception at St. John’s Church, Florence, which preceded the program at The Florence Performing Arts Center.

The Rev. Shay Gaillard, Rector of The Parish Church of St. Helena, Beaufort, and President of the Diocesan Standing Committee, and his wife, Tara, served as the emcees.

Read it all.

One Word Clergy Describe Bishop Lawrence from The Anglican Diocese of SC on Vimeo.

Posted in * Anglican - Episcopal, * South Carolina, Ministry of the Ordained, Parish Ministry

Kendall Harmon’s Sunday sermon–Will we allow our Lord to Teach us to Pray (Matthew 6:5-15)

Listen to it all or there is more there if you so desire.

Posted in * Anglican - Episcopal, * By Kendall, * South Carolina, Ministry of the Ordained, Parish Ministry, Preaching / Homiletics, Sermons & Teachings, Spirituality/Prayer

Bishop Edgar Begins his new Ministry as Bishop-elect

Posted in * Anglican - Episcopal, * South Carolina, Anglican Church in North America (ACNA), Ministry of the Ordained, Parish Ministry

(Prospect) Alice Goodman–Clerical life: Curing clergy burnout

The model and justification of most holidays taken by clergy is Jesus’s custom of going to a deserted place to pray. “He did it: you should too.” From the earliest centuries, Christianity had its contemplative side; these stories are its foundation.

Before that, though, there’s the account of the flight of the Prophet Elijah from the vengeance of Jezebel in the 19th chapter of the first book of Kings. This is the model of clergy burnout. An angel gives him a hot cake baked on a stone, and lets him sleep. Then, when he wakes, he is offered another cake, and sleeps again. Only after that does he go up to the mountain of God where the Lord speaks to him, not in the sound of gale or earthquake, but in sheer silence, the echoing silence when the wind and the earthquake have passed. In that silence, God tells Elijah that there will be a new king, and also that there will be a new prophet, because more people have been faithful than Elijah is willing to credit.

That’s a favourite story of mine, as is the one told by the reclusive 19th-century Hasidic sage Menachem Mendel Morgensztern of Kotzk, better known as the Kotzker Rebbe. It concerns the sacred goat whose horns reached up to the heavens. As he walked through the world, the goat heard a poor old man crying. “Why do you weep?” asked the goat. “Because I have lost my snuffbox.” “Cut a bit from one of my horns,” said the goat, “Take what you need to make a new one.” You can guess what happened next. There are more poor folk in the world who have lost their snuff boxes than you can count.

Read it all.

Posted in Anthropology, Church of England (CoE), Ethics / Moral Theology, Health & Medicine, Ministry of the Ordained, Parish Ministry, Pastoral Theology, Psychology, Stress, Theology

Kendall Harmon’s Sunday sermon–Can we Understand the Beatitudes as they were intended (Matthew 5:1-12)?

Listen to it all or there is more there if you so desire.

Posted in * Anglican - Episcopal, * By Kendall, * South Carolina, Ministry of the Ordained, Parish Ministry, Preaching / Homiletics, Sermons & Teachings, Theology: Scripture

Candidates for Bishop of the Anglican Diocese of Pittsburgh Announced

The Bishop’s Search Committee is very pleased to announce three final candidates for consideration for the next Bishop of the Anglican Diocese of Pittsburgh. In alphabetical order, they are:

  • The Rev. Alex Cameron (President and CEO of the Isaiah Forty Foundation; Diocese of the Upper Midwest)
  • The Rev. Peter Frank (Rector, Church of the Epiphany, Chantilly, VA; Diocese of the Mid-Atlantic)
  • The Rev. Dr. Joel Scandrett (Assistant Professor of Theology, Trinity School for Ministry; Anglican Diocese of Pittsburgh)

Read it all.

Posted in * Anglican - Episcopal, Anglican Church in North America (ACNA), Ministry of the Ordained, Parish Ministry

(The Tablet) Anglican orders and the Catholic Church – analysis

The Tablet understands that the issue has been raised directly with the Pope in recent months, who in turn asked for the question to be considered by Vatican officials. While there is no sign that Apostolicae Curae will be overturned, for several decades Rome has been moving away from the language used by Leo XIII and towards a recognition of the fruits of Anglican ministry. It is already a very different approach to the one found in the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith’s 1998 document, Professio Fidei, which claimed the teaching on Anglican orders was one of the “truths connected to revelation” and was to be held definitively.

The shift draws on the teaching of Vatican II, which recognised the “significant elements” that build up the Church outside of the “visible boundaries” of the Catholic Church, and on the many agreed statements on doctrine that have emerged from the formal dialogues between Anglican and Catholic theologians since the council.

“This issue causes hurt, and the Anglicans are diffident about raising it,” one Church source told The Tablet. “It’s a wound in the relations between the Churches and it would be great if a small step could be taken to healing the wound particularly as Pope Francis in practice recognises Anglican bishops through his joint initiatives with the Archbishop of Canterbury.”

Read it all.

Posted in Church of England (CoE), Ecumenical Relations, Ministry of the Ordained, Roman Catholic

Martin Luther King Jr. in the Christian Century how I changed my Mind series in 1960–My Pilgrimage to nonviolence

I also came to see that liberalism’s superficial optimism concerning human nature caused it to overlook the fact that reason is darkened by sin. The more I thought about human nature the more I saw how our tragic inclination for sin causes us to use our minds to rationalize our actions. Liberalism failed to see that reason by itself is little more than an instrument to justify man’s defensive ways of thinking. Reason, devoid of the purifying power of faith, can never free itself from distortions and rationalizations.

In spite of the fact that I had to reject some aspects of liberalism, I never came to an all-out acceptance of neo-orthodoxy. While I saw neo-orthodoxy as a helpful corrective for a liberalism that had become all too sentimental, I never felt that it provided an adequate answer to the basic questions. If liberalism was too optimistic concerning human nature, neo-orthodoxy was too pessimistic. Not only on the question of man but also on other vital issues, neo-orthodoxy went too far in its revolt. In its attempt to preserve the transcendence of God, which had been neglected by liberalism’s overstress of his immanence, neo-orthodoxy went to the extreme of stressing a God who was hidden, unknown and “wholly other.” In its revolt against liberalism’s overemphasis on the power of reason, neo-orthodoxy fell into a mood of antirationalism and semifundamentalism, stressing a narrow, uncritical biblicism. This approach, I felt, was inadequate both for the church and for personal life.

So although liberalism left me unsatisfied on the question of the nature of man, I found no refuge in neo-orthodoxy. I am now convinced that the truth about man is found neither in liberalism nor in neo-orthodoxy. Each represents a partial truth. A large segment of Protestant liberalism defined man only in terms of his essential nature, his capacity for good. Neo-orthodoxy tended to define man only in terms of his existential nature, his capacity for evil. An adequate understanding of man is found neither in the thesis of liberalism nor in the antithesis of neo-orthodoxy, but in a synthesis which reconciles the truths of both.

Read it all.

Posted in Anthropology, Church History, Ethics / Moral Theology, Ministry of the Ordained, Parish Ministry, Race/Race Relations, Religion & Culture, Theology, Violence

(1st Things) Richard John Neuhaus: Remembering, and Misremembering, Martin Luther King Jr.

As Abernathy tells it—and I believe he is right—he and King were first of all Christians, then Southerners, and then blacks living under an oppressive segregationist regime. King of course came from the black bourgeoisie of Atlanta in which his father, “Daddy King,” had succeeded in establishing himself as a king. Abernathy came from much more modest circumstances, but he was proud of his heritage and, as he writes, wanted nothing more than that whites would address his father as Mr. Abernathy. He and Martin loved the South, and envisioned its coming into its own once the sin of segregation had been expunged.

“Years later,” Abernathy writes that, “after the civil rights movement had peaked and I had taken over [after Martin’s death] as president of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference,” he met with Governor George Wallace. “Governor Wallace, by then restricted to a wheel chair after having been paralyzed by a would-be assassin’s bullet, shook hands with me and welcomed me to the State of Alabama. I smiled, realizing that he had forgotten all about Montgomery and Birmingham, and particularly Selma. ‘This is not my first visit,’ I said. ‘I was born in Alabama—in Marengo County.’ ‘Good,’ said Governor Wallace, ‘then welcome back.’ I really believe he meant it. In his later years he had become one of the greatest friends the blacks had ever had in Montgomery. Where once he had stood in the doorway and barred federal marshals from entering, he now made certain that our people were first in line for jobs, new schools, and other benefits of state government.” Abernathy concludes, “It was a time for reconciliations.”

Read it all (my emphasis).

Posted in Ethics / Moral Theology, History, Ministry of the Ordained, Parish Ministry, Politics in General, Race/Race Relations, Religion & Culture